University of Calgary

Courses

Submitted by dpfitzsi on Tue, 01/22/2008 - 12:48.

GREEK AND ROMAN STUDIES (GRST) COURSES    

These courses examine the political and social development of the ancient world and various aspects of ancient culture and society. They move from basic introductions to the history and culture (200 level) through increasingly detailed study of source-materials and research problems (300 and 400 levels) towards the practice of research (500 level). GRST Courses do not require knowledge of Greek or Latin. English translations of texts and documents are used.
GRST 200 LEVEL courses require no previous preparation. Priority for registration in GRST 205 and 209 is given to first- and second-year students.
GRST 300-level courses have no prerequisities but are not normally open to first-year students.
  

Any two of GRST 337, 339, 341, 345, 347, 349 can be counted towards a major in history (see Department of History program regulations).

The courses where first-year students normally begin are GRST 205 Introduction to Greece and Rome (a general historical survey from the beginnings of classical Greek civilization to the fall of the Roman Empire) and GRST 209 Classical Mythology and Literature (introducing the myth-based poetry and drama of the Greek and Roman world and their social and religious background). Learning in these courses is based on lectures and readings from introductory textbooks and relevant source-material. Lectures include films and other visual material and opportunities for class discussion. Supplementary information is increasingly available via the department's website. Evaluation is done through tests and a final exam which include objective questions and short discussion-essays.

 

GRST 211 Technical Terms of Medicine and the Life Sciences introduces students with medical and scientific interests to the terminology of their disciplines (which is of course based on Greek and Latin vocabulary). This course is delivered by computer.  Assignments and mid term exam are done on Blackboard, the final exam is scheduled through the registar office and will be held on University grounds. There is no formal class time for this course.

GRST 300-level courses are more thorough surveys of history and cultural features in various periods.  These  courses  introduce  the critical study of ancient source-material along with the main lines of modern research and interpretation. Learning processes vary according to subject-matter but typically include lectures with class discussions, readings in primary and secondary sources, and preparation of two or three short essays or a major term-paper. Courses in areas such as technology, art and architecture use visual material extensively. Evaluation normally includes a mid-term test and final exam which require discursive writing.

 

GRST 400- and 500-level courses are topic-based and designed for smaller groups of students. Learning typically includes close examination of texts, documents or material remains and detailed study of current research problems. At the 400-level this process is largely guided by the instructor, while at the 500-level students work more independently. At both levels students contribute individually to the class with oral reports, and also prepare one or two research papers. Evaluation is based on these items and, where appropriate, a final exam.

GRST 481 and 483 Practica offer a quarter- or half-course or full course of experiential-learning credit through activities such as teaching, editing, publishing, translating, performances, exhibitions, museum work, conferences, information and website development, and campus, school and community programs.  The content normally includes the work itself, a written report,  and an oral  report.

GRST 491, 494  Field Work offer a half-course or full course of experiential-learning credit for participation in archaeological field work or comparable projects. The content normally includes the field work itself and a written report.

STUDENTS CAN FOLLOW THEIR SPECIAL INTERESTS IN MANY DIFFERENT WAYS. THIS LIST GROUPS GREEK AND ROMAN STUDIES COURSES UP TO THE 400 LEVEL BY SUBJECT MATTER:


GREEK AND NEAR EASTERN HISTORY

GRST 205         Introduction to Greece and Rome
GRST 335         The Ancient Near East to Alexander the Great

GRST 337*        Early Greece
GRST 339*        History of Classical Greece
GRST 341*        History of The Mediterranean World 323 to 30 BCE
GRST 415         Topics in Early and Class­ical Greek History
GRST 415         Topics in Hellenistic and Roman Republican History
GRST 421         Topics in Greek and Roman Political and Military History



ROMAN AND BYZANTINE HISTORY* 

GRST 205         Introduction to Greece and Rome
GRST 341*        History of The Mediterranean World 323 to 30 BCE
GRST 345*        Rome: the Late Republic and Early Empire
GRST 347*        Late Roman Antiquity
GRST 349*        The Byzantine Empire
GRST 415         Topics in Hellenistic and Roman Republican History
GRST 417         Topics in the History of the Roman Empire
GRST 419         Topics in Late Antiquity
GRST 421         Topics in Greek and Roman Political and Military History


* Any two of the asterisked courses are accepted for credit towards a Major in History



CLASSICAL LITERATURE (IN TRANSLATION)

GRST 209         Classical Mythology and Literature
GRST 355         Greek Poetry and Drama in Translation
GRST 357         Latin Poetry and Drama in Translation
GRST 431         Studies in Ancient Myths
GRST 455         Topics in Greek Literature in Translation
GRST 457         Topics in Latin Literature in Translation


RELIGION AND MYTHODOLY 

GRST 209         Classical Mythology and Literature
GRST 305         Greek and Roman Religion
GRST 431         Studies in Ancient Myths
GRST 433         Topics in Greek and Roman Religion and Intellectual History


EARLY CHRISTIANITY 

GRST 347         Late Roman Antiquity
GRST 349         The Byzantine Empire

GRST 433         Topics in Greek and Roman Religion and Intellectual History and Religious Studies courses in this area



SOCIAL, ECONOMIC AND CULTURAL HISTORY, WOMEN'S STUDIES

GRST 315         Women and the Family in the Greek and Roman World
GRST 423         Topics in Greek and Roman Social and Economic History

GRST 425         Greeks, Romans and Other Cultures: Selected Top



MATERIAL CULTURE (ART, ARCHITECTURE, TECHNOLOGY, ARCHAEOLOGY)            

GRST 321         Ancient Technology

GRST 325         Greek Art and Architecture
GRST 327         Roman Art and Architecture
GRST 445         Topics in Greek Art and Archaeology
GRST 447         Topics in Roman Art and Archaeology
GRST 491, 494  Field Work



GREEK AND LATIN LANGUAGE COURSES

Courses in Greek and Latin teach students to read the texts and documents which are central to Greek and Roman Studies. These languages are also needed in other programs where Greek or Latin texts are important such as English and European literatures, medieval and renaissance history, religious studies, and the history of science and philosophy. Many students learn Latin or Greek because of their relevance to most modern European languages, and for the general training in language-analysis which they provide. 

LANGUAGE STUDY IS OPTIONAL IN THE DEPARTMENT'S MAJOR PROGRAMS AND REQUIRED IN THE HONOURS PROGRAMS AS FOLLOWS:

  • Honours in Greek and Roman Studies: 2 years of Greek or Latin, or 2 years of each
  • Honours in Ancient and Medieval History: 3 years of Latin
  • Honours in Classical and Early Christian Studies: either 3 years of each of greek and latin with one year of hebrew, or 3 years of one and one of the other with 2 years of Hebrew

 

THE NORMAL SEQUENCE IS GREEK/LATIN 201/203/301/303/401/413/525, THE LAST OF WHICH CAN BE REPEATED FOR CREDIT. GRADES OF C- OR BETTER ARE NORMALLY REQUIRED FOR PROGRESS FROM ONE LEVEL TO THE NEXT.

GREEK 201, 203 and LATIN 201, 203 use a single textbook to introduce the basic grammar of the language, including script, pronunciation, vocabulary, word-forms, syntax and typical sentence-structures. Memory-work, analysis, reading and translation practice are the main activities in and out of class. Language-learning is a gradual, cumulative process, so frequent class meetings and homework are essential. Computer-exercises are available as an optional learning resource. Evaluation is based mainly on frequent assignments (translation, sentence-analysis etc.) and quizzes (vocabulary, forms, etc.), and occasional achievement tests including a final exam. Some Web-based sections of Latin 201, 203 are now offered.


LATIN 205, 207
are alternatives to LATIN 201, 203. They are based on scientific texts written in Latin from ancient to early modern times, and will be of special interest to science and engineering students. 

GREEK 301, 303 and LATIN 301, 303 are intermediate courses completing and reviewing the basics of the languages and developing reading skills and translation techniques through short readings from original prose texts such as Plato, Cicero and the New Testament. Higher-level features and new vocabulary are analysed as they are met. Grammar learning and review continue, but learning is increasingly done through study and translation of texts. Class meetings are often devoted to discussion of readings and exercises prepared as homework. Evaluation is based mainly on regular translation assignments and review quizzes and occasional achievement tests (including a final exam) which include translation from both prepared texts and unprepared texts in similar styles.


GREEK 333 and LATIN 333
are supplementary quarter-courses for students who want additional practice and reinforcement in language-work or reading. These may be taken alongside or after Greek/Latin 303 and are especially useful for Spring or Summer study since continuity is an important factor in language-learning.

GREEK 401, 413 and LATIN 401, 413  further develop reading skills and translation techniques using more extensive readings from prose and poetic texts such as Homer, Herodotus, Thucydides, Virgil, Tacitus, and early Christian and Medieval authors. Students prepare these readings as homework for review and discussion in class. Detailed attention is given to linguistic, stylistic, rhetorical and poetic features, and some to the historical context and literary qualities of the works studied. Evaluation is normally based on class performance (preparation of course readings etc.) and a mid-term test and final exam including translation and comment on extracts from prepared texts and translation from unprepared texts in similar styles. One or two assignments of limited scope involving analytical writing may be included (depending on the texts studied).


GREEK 433, 453
and LATIN 433, 453 are supplementary quarter-courses like Greek/Latin 351.

GREEK 525 and LATIN 525 are advanced courses involving study and analysis of whole texts or groups of texts with extensive readings in the original language. Class discussion is devoted both to technical study of the text (language, style, sources, etc.) and critical understanding of the work's literary, historical and intellectual features in the light of modern scholarship. Evaluation typically includes the student’s contribution to class discussion, a term-paper on a research topic related to the text, and an examination including prepared translation with analytical comment and unprepared translation.

GREEK 551 and LATIN 551 are Directed Study courses (repeatable for credit) allowing guided independent study of texts or aspects of the languages in which a student may have a special interest.